The Movement

The market for local food is growing at 20 to 30 percent annually in the U.S., while the market for traditional food is essentially flat.

The Colorado agricultural sector produces about $12 billion of food annually, yet 97% of the food that we eat in Colorado comes from out-of-state.

By aggregating product, a food hub can professionalize the relationship between buyers and local small farmers, allowing local food to better compete with the major distribution companies that primarily supply food from large growers, corporate farms, and imports.

Most food travels an average of 1,400 miles to reach a grocery shelf and is about two weeks old when it gets there.

Because of this, much of this food is harvested well before maturity and is often processed to increase shelf life and improve appearance. These factors affect taste and nutritional value.

The local food movement is taking off nationwide, and Colorado is no exception. A myriad of state and local organizations are working to promote local food. The front line in Colorado consists of food hubs, CSAs (Community Supported Agriculture), on-line buying groups, and distribution networks. These are the organizations that actually get food from small farms to consumers. How these distribution organizations function will have a lot to do with the future of the Colorado local food movement.

The Movement

The market for local food is growing at 20 to 30 percent annually in the U.S., while the market for traditional food is essentially flat.

The Colorado agricultural sector produces about $12 billion of food annually, yet 97% of the food that we eat in Colorado comes from out-of-state.

By aggregating product, a food hub can professionalize the relationship between buyers and local small farmers, allowing local food to better compete with the major distribution companies that primarily supply food from large growers, corporate farms, and imports.

Most food travels an average of 1,400 miles to reach a grocery shelf and is about two weeks old when it gets there.

Because of this, much of this food is harvested well before maturity and is often processed to increase shelf life and improve appearance. These factors affect taste and nutritional value.

The local food movement is taking off nationwide, and Colorado is no exception. A myriad of state and local organizations are working to promote local food. The front line in Colorado consists of food hubs, CSAs (Community Supported Agriculture), on-line buying groups, and distribution networks. These are the organizations that actually get food from small farms to consumers. How these distribution organizations function will have a lot to do with the future of the Colorado local food movement.

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